Images of radiometric dating

Illustration of how the earliest formed minerals can be separated from a magma by settling. The remaining melt could migrate to a number of different locations and, upon further crystallization, generate rocks having a composition much different from the parent magma. Faure discusses fractional crystallization relating to U and Th in his book p.

These values may be taken as an indication of the very low abundance of these elements in the mantle and crust of the Earth. In the course of partial melting and fractional crystallization of magma, U and Th are concentrated in the liquid phase and become incorporated into the more silica-rich products. For that reason, igneous rocks of granitic composition are strongly enriched in U and Th compared to rocks of basaltic or ultramafic composition.


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Progressive geochemical differentiation of the upper mantle of the Earth has resulted in the concentration of U and Th into the rocks of the continental crust compared to those of the upper mantle. The concentration of Pb is usually so much higher than U, that a 2- to 3-fold increase of U doesn't change the percent composition much e. Finally, we have a third quotation from Elaine G. Kennedy in Geoscience Reports, Spring , No. Contamination and fractionation issues are frankly acknowledged by the geologic community.

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If this occurs, initial volcanic eruptions would have a preponderance of daughter products relative to the parent isotopes. Such a distribution would give the appearance of age. As the magma chamber is depleted in daughter products, subsequent lava flows and ash beds would have younger dates. Such a scenario does not answer all of the questions or solve all of the problems that radiometric dating poses for those who believe the Genesis account of Creation and the Flood. It does suggest at least one aspect of the problem that could be researched more thoroughly.

So we have two kinds of processes taking place. There are those processes taking place when lava solidifies and various minerals crystallize out at different times. There are also processes taking place within a magma chamber that can cause differences in the composition of the magma from the top to the bottom of the chamber, since one might expect the temperature at the top to be cooler. Both kinds of processes can influence radiometric dates. In addition, the magma chamber would be expected to be cooler all around its borders, both at the top and the bottom as well as in the horizontal extremities, and these effects must also be taken into account.

For example, heavier substances will tend to sink to the bottom of a magma chamber. Also, substances with a higher melting point will tend to crystallize out at the top of a magma chamber and fall, since it will be cooler at the top. These substances will then fall to the lower portion of the magma chamber, where it is hotter, and remelt.

This will make the composition of the magma different at the top and bottom of the chamber. This could influence radiometric dates. This mechanism was suggested by Jon Covey and others. The solubility of various substances in the magma also could be a function of temperature, and have an influence on the composition of the magma at the top and bottom of the magma chamber. Finally, minerals that crystallize at the top of the chamber and fall may tend to incorporate other substances, and so these other substances will also tend to have a change in concentration from the top to the bottom of the magma chamber.

There are quite a number of mechanisms in operation in a magma chamber. I count at least three so far -- sorting by density, sorting by melting point, and sorting by how easily something is incorporated into minerals that form at the top of a magma chamber. Then you have to remember that sometimes one has repeated melting and solidification, introducing more complications.

There is also a fourth mechanism -- differences in solubilities. How anyone can keep track of this all is a mystery to me, especially with the difficulties encountered in exploring magma chambers. These will be definite factors that will change relative concentrations of parent and daughter isotopes in some way, and call into question the reliability of radiometric dating.

In fact, I think this is a very telling argument against radiometric dating. Another possibility to keep in mind is that lead becomes gaseous at low temperatures, and would be gaseous in magma if it were not for the extreme pressures deep in the earth. It also becomes very mobile when hot.

These processes could influence the distribution of lead in magma chambers. Let me suggest how these processes could influence uranium-lead and thorium-lead dates: The following is a quote from The Earth: The magnesium and iron rich minerals come from the mantle subducted oceanic plates , while granite comes from continental sediments crustal rock.

The mantle part solidifies first, and is rich in magnesium, iron, and calcium. So it is reasonable to expect that initially, the magma is rich in iron, magnesium, and calcium and poor in uranium, thorium, sodium, and potassium. Later on the magma is poor in iron, magnesium, and calcium and rich in uranium, thorium, sodium, and potassium.

It doesn't say which class lead is in. But lead is a metal, and to me it looks more likely that lead would concentrate along with the iron. If this is so, the magma would initially be poor in thorium and uranium and rich in lead, and as it cooled it would become rich in thorium and uranium and poor in lead. Thus its radiometric age would tend to decrease rapidly with time, and lava emitted later would tend to look younger. Another point is that of time. Suppose that the uranium does come to the top by whatever reason. Perhaps magma that is uranium rich tends to be lighter than other magma.

Or maybe the uranium poor rocks crystallize out first and the remaining magma is enriched in uranium.

Radiometric Dating Stock Photos & Radiometric Dating Stock Images - Alamy

Would this cause trouble for our explanation? It depends how fast it happened.

How Does Radiometric Dating Work? - Ars Technica

Some information from the book Uranium Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Geology provided by Jon Covey gives us evidence that fractionation processes are making radiometric dates much, much too old. The half life of U is 4. Thus radium is decaying 3 million times as fast as U At equilibrium, which should be attained in , years for this decay series, we should expect to have 3 million times as much U as radium to equalize the amount of daughter produced.

Cortini says geologists discovered that ten times more Ra than the equilibrium value was present in rocks from Vesuvius. They found similar excess radium at Mount St. Helens, Vulcanello, and Lipari and other volcanic sites. The only place where radioactive equilibrium of the U series exists in zero age lavas is in Hawiian rocks.

We need to consider the implications of this for radiometric dating. How is this excess of radium being produced? This radium cannot be the result of decay of uranium, since there is far too much of it. Either it is the result of an unknown decay process, or it is the result of fractionation which is greatly increasing the concentration of radium or greatly decreasing the concentration of uranium.

Thus only a small fraction of the radium present in the lava at most 10 percent is the result of decay of the uranium in the lava. This is interesting because both radium and lead are daughter products of uranium. If similar fractionation processes are operating for lead, this would mean that only a small fraction of the lead is the result of decay from the parent uranium, implying that the U-Pb radiometric dates are much, much too old. Cortini, in an article appearing in the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research also suggests this possibility. By analogy with the behaviour of Ra, Th and U it can be suggested that Pb, owing to its large mobility, was also fed to the magma by fluids.

This can and must be tested. The open-system behaviour of Pb, if true, would have dramatic consequences In fact, U and Th both have isotopes of radium in their decay chains with half lives of a week or two, and 6. Any process that is concentrating one isotope of radium will probably concentrate the others as well and invalidate these dating methods, too. Radium has a low melting point degrees K which may account for its concentration at the top of magma chambers. What radiometric dating needs to do to show its reliability is to demonstrate that no such fractionation could take place.

Can this be done? With so many unknowns I don't think so. How Uranium and Thorium are preferentially incorporated in various minerals I now give evidences that uranium and thorium are incorporated into some minerals more than others. This is not necessarily a problem for radiometric dating, because it can be taken into account.

But as we saw above, processes that take place within magma chambers involving crystallization could result in a different concentration of uranium and thorium at the top of a magma chamber than at the bottom. This can happen because different minerals incorporate different amounts of uranium and thorium, and these different minerals also have different melting points and different densities. If minerals that crystallize at the top of a magma chamber and fall, tend to incorporate a lot of uranium, this will tend to deplete uranium at the top of the magma chamber, and make the magma there look older.

Concerning the distribution of parent and daughter isotopes in various substances, there are appreciable differences. Faure shows that in granite U is 4. Some process is causing the differences in the ratios of these magmatic rocks. Depending on their oxidation state, according to Faure, uranium minerals can be very soluble in water while thorium compounds are, generally, very insoluble.

These elements also show preferences for the minerals in which they are incorporated, so that they will tend to be "dissolved" in certain mineral "solutions" preferentially to one another. More U is found in carbonate rocks, while Th has a very strong preference for granites in comparison. I saw a reference that uranium reacts strongly, and is never found pure in nature. So the question is what the melting points of its oxides or salts would be, I suppose. I also saw a statement that uranium is abundant in the crust, but never found in high concentrations.

To me this indicates a high melting point for its minerals, as those with a low melting point might be expected to concentrate in the magma remaining after others crystallized out. Such a high melting point would imply fractionation in the magma. Thorium is close to uranium in the periodic table, so it may have similar properties, and similar remarks may apply to it. It turns out that uranium in magma is typically found in the form of uranium dioxide, with a melting point of degrees centrigrade. This high melting point suggests that uranium would crystallize and fall to the bottom of magma chambers.

Geologists are aware of the problem of initial concentration of daughter elements, and attempt to take it into account. U-Pb dating attempts to get around the lack of information about initial daughter concentrations by the choice of minerals that are dated.

For example, zircons are thought to accept little lead but much uranium. Thus geologists assume that the lead in zircons resulted from radioactive decay. But I don't know how they can be sure how much lead zircons accept, and even they admit that zircons accept some lead. Lead could easily reside in impurities and imperfections in the crystal structure. Also, John Woodmorappe's paper has some examples of anomalies involving zircons. It is known that the crystal structure of zircons does not accept much lead.

However, it is unrealistic to expect a pure crystal to form in nature. Perfect crystals are very rare. In reality, I would expect that crystal growth would be blocked locally by various things, possibly particles in the way. Then the surrounding crystal surface would continue to grow and close up the gap, incorporating a tiny amount of magma.

I even read something about geologists trying to choose crystals without impurities by visual examination when doing radiometric dating. Thus we can assume that zircons would incorporate some lead in their impurities, potentially invalidating uranium-lead dates obtained from zircons. Chemical fractionation, as we have seen, calls radiometric dates into question. But this cannot explain the distribution of lead isotopes. There are actually several isotopes of lead that are produced by different parent substances uranium , uranium , and thorium.

One would not expect there to be much difference in the concentration of lead isotopes due to fractionation, since isotopes have properties that are very similar. So one could argue that any variations in Pb ratios would have to result from radioactive decay. However, the composition of lead isotopes between magma chambers could still differ, and lead could be incorporated into lava as it traveled to the surface from surrounding materials.

I also recall reading that geologists assume the initial Pb isotope ratios vary from place to place anyway. Later we will see that mixing of two kinds of magma, with different proportions of lead isotopes, could also lead to differences in concentrations. Mechanism of uranium crystallization and falling through the magma We now consider in more detail the process of fractionation that can cause uranium to be depleted at the top of magma chambers. Uranium and thorium have high melting points and as magma cools, these elements crystallize out of solution and fall to the magma chamber's depths and remelt.

This process is known as fractional crystallization. What this does is deplete the upper parts of the chamber of uranium and thorium, leaving the radiogenic lead. As this material leaves, that which is first out will be high in lead and low in parent isotopes. This will date oldest. Magma escaping later will date younger because it is enriched in U and Th. There will be a concordance or agreement in dates obtained by these seemingly very different dating methods.

This mechanism was suggested by Jon Covey. Tarbuck and Lutgens carefully explain the process of fractional crystallization in The Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology. They show clear drawings of crystallized minerals falling through the magma and explain that the crystallized minerals do indeed fall through the magma chamber.

Radioactive Dating

Further, most minerals of uranium and thorium are denser than other minerals, especially when those minerals are in the liquid phase. Crystalline solids tend to be denser than liquids from which they came. But the degree to which they are incorporated in other minerals with high melting points might have a greater influence, since the concentrations of uranium and thorium are so low. Now another issue is simply the atomic weight of uranium and thorium, which is high.

Any compound containing them is also likely to be heavy and sink to the bottom relative to others, even in a liquid form. If there is significant convection in the magma, this would be minimized, however. At any rate, there will be some effects of this nature that will produce some kinds of changes in concentration of uranium and thorium relative to lead from the top to the bottom of a magma chamber.

Some of the patterns that are produced may appear to give valid radiometric dates. The latter may be explained away due to various mechanisms. Let us consider processes that could cause uranium and thorium to be incorporated into minerals with a high melting point. I read that zircons absorb uranium, but not much lead. Thus they are used for U-Pb dating. But many minerals take in a lot of uranium. It is also known that uranium is highly reactive. To me this suggests that it is eager to give up its 2 outer electrons. This would tend to produce compounds with a high dipole moment, with a positive charge on uranium and a negative charge on the other elements.

This would in turn tend to produce a high melting point, since the atoms would attract one another electrostatically. I'm guessing a little bit here. There are a number of uranium compounds with different melting points, and in general it seems that the ones with the highest melting points are more stable. I would suppose that in magma, due to reactions, most of the uranium would end up in the most stable compounds with the highest melting points. These would also tend to have high dipole moments. The absolute radiocarbon standard is wood, the OX-I standard has an activity of 0.

A variant of this equation is also used when the samples are analysed by AMS. In the s it was observed that the radiocarbon timescale was not perfect. The age of known artefacts from Egypt were too young when measured by radiocarbon dating. A scientist from the Netherlands Hessel de Vries tested this by radiocarbon dating tree rings of know ages de Vries, This brings us to two reasons why a radiocarbon date is not a true calendar age.

The true half-life of 14C is years and not the originally measured years used in the radiocarbon age calculation, and the proportion of 14C in the atmosphere is not consistent through time. The latter is due in part to fluctuations in the cosmic ray flux into our atmosphere e. Since then there have been many studies examining the variations in the 14C production and its effects on the radiocarbon age to calendar age calibration e.

Stuiver, ; Edwards et al. Since fossil fuel is derived from millions of year old organic carbon it contains no 14C. It is essential to have radiocarbon ages calibrated to calendar ages so as to have an accurate measure of time. It is also important to be able to compare ages with samples dated by other means, e. It therefore became necessary to create a calibration between radiocarbon dates and calendar age. The ideal calibration material must have a precise calendar age and sample the atmosphere carbon reservoir of interest. Fortunately annual tree rings provide a perfect calibration material available in nature.

Since those first measurements in the s a detailed, precise calibration between radiocarbon and calendar age has been developed using many long-lived tree species. Dendrochronology provides the accurate calendar age for each ring in the tree, and then a radiocarbon age can be assigned to each calendar age. Several tree-ring chronologies have been constructed including the Belfast Irish Oak chronology Baillie et al.

Friedrich et al, ; Schaub et al. However this is as far back in time as the continuous tree-ring radiocarbon calibration can be extended at present. More old trees are being discovered every year and this may eventually increase this calibration dataset at a later date. They are called floating because they do not have a direct calendar age and must use the radiocarbon to match their ages.

For example, many sections of old sub-fossil New Zealand Kauri trees have been found that span time from , years old Hogg et al.


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Other calibration curves have been proposed by individual research groups for example Fairbanks et al. These calibration curves form the basis of several online calibration programs that take the radiocarbon age and output a calibrated age, the major online calibration programs are;. In , a radioactive dating method for determining the age of organic materials, was developed by Willard Frank Libby , who received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in for his radiocarbon research.

All living plants and animals contain carbon, and while most of the total carbon is carbon, a very small amount of the total carbon is radioactive carbon Libby found that the amount of carbon remains constant in a living plant or animal and is in equilibrium with the environment, however once the organism dies, the carbon within it diminishes according to its rate of decay.

This is because living organisms utilize carbon from the environment for metabolism. Libby, and his team of researchers, measured the amount of carbon in a piece of acacia wood from an Egyptian tomb dating BC. His prediction was correct. Radioactive dating is also used to study the effects of pollution on an environment. For example, during the s, when many above-ground tests of nuclear weapons occurred, Earth was littered by cesium half-life of By collecting samples of sediment, scientists are able to obtain various types of kinetic information based on the concentration of cesium found in the samples.

Lead, a naturally occurring radionuclide with a half-life of Radium, a grandparent of lead, decays to radon, the radioactive gas that can be found in some basements. Because it is a gas, radon exists in the atmosphere. Radon decays to polonium, which attaches to particles in the atmosphere and is consequently rained out — falling into and traveling through streams, rivers, and lakes.

Radioactive dating has proved to be an invaluable tool in many scientific fields, including geology, archeology, paleoclimatology, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology, and biomedicine. This method of dating has also been used to study artifacts that have received a great deal of public attention, such as the Shroud of Turin with highly controversial and disputed results , the Dead Sea Scrolls , Egyptian tombs, and Stonehenge.

Since the discovery of radioactive dating, there have been several improvements in the equipment used to measure radioactive residuals in samples. For example, with the invention of accelerator mass spectometry, scientists have been able to date samples very accurately. See also Radioactive decay. The discovery of the radioactive properties of uranium in by Henri Becquerel subsequently revolutionized the way scientists measured the age of artifacts and supported the theory that the earth was considerably older than what some scientists believed. There are several methods of determining the actual or relative age of the earth's crust: Although the half-life of rubidium is even longer than uranium 49 billion years or 10 times the age of the earth , it is useful because it can be found in almost all igneous rocks.

In , a radioactive dating method for determining the age of organic materials, was developed by Willard Frank Libby , who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in for his radiocarbon research. All living plants and animals contain carbon , and while most of the total carbon is carbon, a very small amount of the total carbon is radioactive carbon Libby, and his team of researchers, measured the amount of carbon in a piece of acacia wood from an Egyptian tomb dating b.

Scientists are able to study recent climactic events by measuring the amount of a specific radioactive nuclide that is known to have attached itself to certain particles that have been incorporated into the earth's surface.

radiometric dating

For example, during the s, when many above-ground tests of nuclear weapons occurred, the earth was littered by cesium half-life of Radon decays to polonium, which attaches to particles in the atmosphere and is consequently rained out—falling into and traveling through streams, rivers , and lakes. Radioactive dating has proved to be an invaluable tool and has been used in many scientific fields, including geology , archeology, paleoclimatology, atmospheric science, oceanography , hydrology , and biomedicine.

This method of dating has also been used to study artifacts that have received a great deal of public attention, such as the Shroud of Turin , the Dead Sea Scrolls , Egyptian tombs, and Stonehenge. Radioactive dating is a method of determining the approximate age of an old object by measuring the amount of a known radioactive element it contains. Rocks as well as fossil plants and animals can be dated by this process. It has given paleontologists a person specializing in the study of fossils as well as geologists a person specializing in the study of the origin, history, and structure of Earth a powerful way of dating ancient objects.

Until the discovery of radioactive dating , scientists had no way of approximating how old any part of Earth was.