Nhs pregnancy dating scan

week pregnancy dating scan: what will it tell me? | MadeForMums

The screening test for Down's syndrome used at this stage of pregnancy is called the "combined test". It involves a blood test and measuring the fluid at the back of the baby's neck nuchal translucency with an ultrasound scan. This is sometimes called a nuchal translucency scan. The nuchal translucency measurement can be taken during the dating scan.

Having an Ultrasound scan at Manchester Royal Infirmary

Find out more about the combined screening test for Down's syndrome. You won't be offered the combined screening test if your dating scan happens after 14 weeks. Instead, you will be offered another blood test between 14 and 20 weeks of pregnancy to screen for the risk of Down's syndrome. This test is not quite as accurate as the combined test.

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At 8 to 14 weeks of pregnancy, usually around 12 weeks, you should be offered a pregnancy dating scan. It will let you know a more reliable due date and check how your baby is developing. Information for the Public.

Tests, scans and checks

Early dating scans Source: All women will be offered a dating scan , and an 20 week fetal anomaly ultrasound scan , in line with NICE and UK Ultrasound scans in pregnancy - NHS Source: Find out about ultrasound baby scans, including the dating scan and anomaly scan, to check for abnormalities in the baby during pregnancy. The management of babies born extremely preterm at less than 26 weeks of gestation: British Association of Perinatal Medicine. This guidance relating to the management of the birth of extremely preterm babies at less than 26 weeks of gestation is aimed at both parents and healthcare professionals.